Market Forecast Publishes Their Small Satellites Analysis and Report

Market Forecast’s latest report “Small Satellites — Market & Technology Forecast to 2027” examines, analyzes, and predicts the evolution of smallsat technologies, markets, and outlays (expenditures) over the next 8 years — 2019 -2027 in the space industry.  The report also examines smallsat markets geographically, focusing on the top 95 percent of global markets, in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

A small satellite, miniaturized satellite, or smallsat, is a satellite of low mass and size, usually under 500 kg. (1,100 lb).

While all such satellites can be referred to as “small,” different classifications are used to categorize them based on mass. Motivated by visions of hundreds, if not thousands, of small satellites launching yearly; buoyed by venture capitals markets that become responsive to space endeavors; and encouraged by the highly visible success of SpaceX, entrepreneurs across the globe have embarked on what was once considered the incredibly risky and financially non-rewarding venture of designing and fielding a new rocket. The global smallsat market is dominated by companies based in the United States, China and European Union

The report reveals how smallsats are used today to add real value. To provide the most thorough and realistic forecast, this report provides a twin-scenario analysis, including “steady state,” emergence of new smallsat technology. This report classifies the smallsat industry into five major groups which are thoroughly researched and forecast figures from 2019 – 2027 are provided.

In particular, this report provides an in-depth analysis of the following:

  • Overview: Snapshot of the various small sat tech in the space market during 2019-2027, including highlights of the demand drivers, trends and challenges. It also provides a snapshot of the spending with respect to regions as well as segments. It also sheds light on the emergence on new technologies
  • Market Dynamics: Insights into the technological developments in this market and a detailed analysis of the changing preferences of governments around the world. It also analyzes changing industry structure trends and the challenges faced by the industry participants.
  • Segment Analysis: Insights into the various Systems market from a segmental perspective and a detailed analysis of factors influencing the market for each segment.
  • Regional Review: Insights into modernization patterns and budgetary allocation for top countries within a region.
  • Regional Analysis: Insights into the Systems market from a regional perspective and a detailed analysis of factors influencing the market for each region.
  • Trend Analysis:  Key Small Sat Markets: Analysis of the key markets in each region, providing an analysis of the various Systems segments expected to be in demand in each region.
  • Key Program Analysis: Details of the top programs in each segment expected to be executed during the forecast period.
  • Competitive landscape Analysis: Analysis of competitive landscape of this industry. It provides an overview of key companies, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives and a brief financial analysis.

 

To learn more about the report, access this direct infolink…


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…

KLEOS Space Funding to Initiate Procurement of Second Smallsats Cluster

Kleos Space S.A. (ASX: KSS, Frankfurt: KS1) has entered into a binding term sheet for a 1.83 million euros debt instrument, to be issued in the form of secured convertible notes.

The procurement of Kleos’ 2nd cluster of satellites can now commence and the launch in 2020 will be booked over the coming months. The second cluster will collect more data which in turn means an improved and higher value product for our customers.

The multi-satellite Scouting Mission system will form the foundation of a constellation that delivers a global picture of hidden maritime activity, enhancing the intelligence capability of government and commercial entities when AIS (Automatic Identification System) is defeated, imagery is unclear or targets are out of patrol range. The first scouting mission is comprised of 4x smallsats built by GomSpace in Denmark, each the size of a shoebox.

The first tranche convertible notes will have an aggregate face value of equivalent 1.35 million euros and will be issued at a discount for an aggregate issue price of 1.22 million euros. The First tranche notes will have an interest rate of 10 percent per six-month period, may be converted into CDIs at an issue price of equivalent 0.305 euros per CDI at the election of the investors, and must be redeemed 6 months from the date of issue unless earlier converted by the holder.

The maximum number of CDIs that may be issued on conversion of the first tranche notes is 2.96 million euros. The investors may elect to subscribe for the second tranche notes which will have an aggregate face value of equivalent 673.000 euros and will be issued at a discount for an aggregate issue price of 612.000 euros and will otherwise be issued on the same terms as the first tranche notes.

The maximum number of CDIs that may be issued on conversion of the second tranche notes is 1,480,000 euros. The investors will also be granted up to 917,000 euros options over CDIs with an exercise price of 0.245 euros per CDI and a three- year exercise period.

Andy Bowyer, CEO of Kleos, said that this investment is targeted to enable the firm to accelerate business development and revenue generating activities. Additional product development engineers will be recruited to strengthen the management team to assist with the delivery of the company’s data products. Over the coming months, KLEOS Space will also recruit sales and sales support professionals to help respond to inbound sales inquiries and manage key accounts, increasing orders and contracts.


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…

Astrome Gearing Up to Distribute Satellite Internet to Emerging Economies

Astrome is making headway toward the firm’s mission to radically transform satellite broadband internet services.

The company has designed a satellite constellation that will complement terrestrial fiber and support the expansion of 4G and upcoming 5G networks into remote and rural areas and will also meet the ever-increasing data demand from consumers and Content Distribution Networks, such as Netflix and Amazon.

Having developed and patented its millimeter wave wireless communication technology, Astrome is now gearing up to launch SpaceNet —- an LEO constellation of 198 ultra-High Throughput Satellites (ultra-HTS). The company is building its financial layer using blockchain technology.

Astrome’s French subsidiary has created the SPW token that tokenizes all of SpaceNet’s data services. The tokenization will allow the company to pre-sell its internet services. Users possessing the tokens can access the firm’s internet offerings in the service regions, or, enable other users to access the company’s internet services after the constellation is launched. Astrome’s Initial Coin Offering (ICO) is ongoing under the French jurisdiction and SPW tokens may be purchased at https://www.astrome.io. The ICO adheres to the guidelines set out in the new French PACTE law. Astrome also has additional incentives to users who wish to purchase bulk capacity.

SpaceNet, with its total network capacity of 24 Tbps, is uniquely positioned to meet the growing demand for high capacity networks. In addition to fueling the 5G revolution with quality satellite backhaul, SpaceNet will also provide affordable, shore-like services to mariners and tourists who are sailing on the high seas. This would be a remarkable improvement from current state-of-the-art maritime connectivity which is sparingly available and exorbitantly priced. SpaceNet will also provide Direct-To-Home (DTH) internet and users can access the service with a flat, box-shaped integrated antenna equipment mounted on the rooftop.   


Astrome U-HTS infographic.

There are a number of competitors all launching a much higher number of satellites than Astrome’s 198 satellites. Astrome differentiates itself by its patented technology, which offers 10 times more data throughput per satellite and 8 times lower CAPEX cost. Their patented technology has already been proven on the ground and the company plans a space test for early next year.

SpaceNet services will be available in emerging economies in South Asia, South East Asia, Africa, Middle East, South America, Australia, and parts of North America. The coverage region will also include several major shipping and air routes.

Astrome started out in 2015 as a startup incubated at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore. Since then, the company has developed an innovative mmWave communication technology for both terrestrial and space communication. ‘GigaMesh’, Astrome’s product for the telecom markets, enables operators to upgrade their existing networks without laying additional fibre and serve their customers better. The product launch is expected to be later this year.

Iran Nears Completion of Their Pars 1 Satellite


Iran’s Pars 1 satellite.

Iran Space Research Center (SRI) is to deliver a domestically designed and manufactured remote sensing satellite — Pars 1 — to the nation’s Communication and IT Ministry in December of 2019, the center’s head announced on August 18.

As Hossein Samimi told Mehr news agency, Pars 1 is passing the final steps in SRI. He added that the research center is planning to design and produce remote sensing satellite Pars 2 and in this regard will cooperate with Iranian universities and private companies. “Pars 2 is more developed than Pars 1 and comes with a higher resolution and better operation,” he said.

SRI has many different projects namely remote sensing satellites such as Saba, Pars 1 and 2 and telecommunications satellites such as Mesbah-2, Zohreh, Ghaem-1 and SRIsat. The center is focused on producing ‘Remote Sensing’ and ‘Communication Satellites’ based on Iran’s sixth, five-year development plan. 

It is intended to develop space technology by conducting research, plan making, localization, implementing and monitoring projects as well as recruiting and training professionals in different space-related areas.

Article source: Mehr News Agency


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…

FCC Dismisses ARRL, AMSAT Requests in Small Satellite Proceeding

An FCC Report and Order (R&O) released August 2 in the so-called ‘small satellite’ rulemaking proceeding, IB Docket 18-86, failed to address concerns expressed by ARRL and AMSAT. 

Both organizations filed comments on the FCC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the proceeding last year, seeking changes in the FCCs interpretations and procedures affecting satellites operating on Amateur Satellite Service frequencies.

“These comments address topics outside the scope of this proceeding, and we decline to adopt any of the requested rule modifications or updates at this time,” the FCC said in the R&O. The FCC did mention amateur satellites in its 2018 NPRM, explaining what they are and describing the documentation and authorization process, but it did not solicit comments.

“The Commission did not seek comment in the NPRM on any modifications or updates to the rules governing Experimental or amateur satellite licensing. The streamlined Part 25 small satellite process adopted in the Order is an alternative to existing license processes and does not replace or modify the authorization procedures for satellites currently contained in Parts 5, 25, or 97 of the Commission’s rules,” the FCC explained. 

“Nevertheless, we received a number of comments in response to the NPRM, particularly regarding the rules applicable to amateur satellite operations, suggesting that aspects of those rules be im- proved or clarified.”

In its 2018 NPRM, the FCC had said, “Because the type of operations that qualify as amateur [is] narrowly defined, an amateur satellite authorization will not be appropriate for many small satellite operations.”

In its 2018 comments, ARRL said it wanted the FCC to preclude exploitation of amateur spectrum by commercial small-satellite users authorized under Part 5 Experimental rules and suggested that the FCC adopt a “a bright line test” to define and distinguish satellites that should be permitted to operate under Amateur Satellite rules.

ARRL’s position was to support and encourage college and university Amateur Radio experiments where the sponsor of the experiment is a licensed radio amateur and all operation in amateur spectrum is compliant with Part 97. Part 5 Experimental authorizations for satellites intended to operate in amateur allocations by non-amateur sponsors should be discouraged, absent a compelling show of need, ARRL told the FCC.

The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) announced in 2017 that it would no longer coordinate non-amateur satellite operations unless directed to do so by the national administration, and it adopted new satellite frequency coordination guidelines that require educational and university satellites to have an identified amateur component.
AMSAT’s comments reflected many of the same concerns that ARRL had expressed.

Southgate Amateur Radio News

Rocket Lab Successfully Launches Their “Look Ma No Hands” Mission


Rocket Lab’s Look Ma, No Hands mission Electron rocket’s liftoff from the Mahia Peninsula in New Zealand.

Rocket Lab’s Lift-off of the Look Ma, No Hands mission occurred at 12:12 UTC on August 19, 2019, from the company’s Launch Complex 1 on New Zealand’s Mahia Peninsula.

Watch the video of the liftoff at this direct link… (launch sequence initiated at 22:04 time code)

A tweet from the company shortly after the launch said that all payloads have been deployed, bringing the total Electron launches to date to eight, with 39 satellites delivered to their planned orbits.

The mission is manifested with satellites destined to begin a new constellation for UNSEENLABS, as well as more rideshare payloads for Spaceflight, consisting of a spacecraft for BlackSky and the United States Air Force Space Command.

The mission is manifested with a cubesat that will form the cornerstone of a new maritime surveillance constellation for French company UNSEENLABS. The constellation aims to deliver precise, reliable, and secure maritime data, enabling organizations to monitor their own vessels and observe those that present risks, such as pirates and illegal vessels.

Mission management and rideshare aggregator, Spaceflight, also manifested three satellites on its second rideshare mission with Rocket Lab. Among the rideshare payloads is BlackSky’s Global-4 Earth-imaging satellite. The satellite will join BlackSky Global-3, which was launched to LEO on an Electron vehicle in June 2019. BlackSky’s constellation delivers rapid-revisit satellite imagery to assist with monitoring economic activity such as crop development and herd migration, or surveying damage following natural disasters.

The final spacecraft manifested on the mission are two experimental satellites for the United States Air Force Space Command, designed to test new technologies including propulsion, power, communications, and drag capabilities for potential applications on future spacecraft.


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…

Forrester Reports: SoftBank Writes Down Stake in OneWeb

Chris Forrester, the lead journalist for the Advanced Television infosite, is reporting that Japanese investment fund SoftBank has written down the value of its significant stake in satellite constellation OneWeb by £380 million (€414.7m).

OneWeb has also attracted investment cash from Virgin Group, Airbus and others, and while it already has six trial satellites on-orbit, plans are to increase the fleet by about 650 satellites over the next two years.


Journalist
Chris Forrester.

SoftBank, via its Vision Fund, has invested two major tranches of cash into OneWeb. As part of its initial funding, the company received around $1 billion from the Japanese bank in 2015 plus an additional $1.25 billion earlier this year.

Softbank owns some 47 percent of OneWeb, according to filings with UK regulators.


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…

IoT Coverage Across Australia to Improve Thanks to Myriota and Optus Business Agreement

Satellite communications business Myriota and telecommunications company Optus Business have joined forces to bolster Internet of Things (IoT) coverage across regional Australia.

In a statement released on August 20, Myriota said the telco-nanosatellite agreement would offer low-cost, long battery life connectivity for millions of devices across multiple industries by combining Optus’ national networks and digital enablement capabilities with Myriota’s direct-to-orbit technology.


Myriota’s Dr. Alex Grant with Optus Business Managing Director Chris Mitchell at Lot Fourteen in Adelaide, South Australia.

Photo is courtesy of Rosina Possingham.

The announcement follows a productive year for Myriota, which has become a global leader in nanosatellite Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity and is based at Lot Fourteen — an innovation precinct in the CBD of Adelaide, South Australia. Earlier this month, the South Australian company announced a partnership with Queensland AgTech business Goanna Ag to unlock the power of remote monitoring, and in July the Adelaide startup became the first to pen a statement of strategic intent with the Australian Space Agency.

Spun out of the University of South Australia in 2015, Myriota last year raised $15 million through a Series A funding round from companies including the venture capital arm of Optus’ parent company Singtel.

Myriota CEO and co-founder Dr. Alex Grant said the company was already trialing the partnership with Optus customers and expected to continue onboarding customers and said the latest collaboration would unlock new opportunities for IoT applications across a wide range of industries. He added that remote connectivity has long been the missing piece of the puzzle for IoT across industries such as logistics and farming and the company is thrilled to partner with Optus Business to provide a comprehensive connectivity offering. Previously, satellite connectivity has not been available or affordable for businesses with remote assets, but nanosatellites are providing a more attainable and affordable solution. By combining Optus’ national networks with the firm’s nanosatellite capability, Myriota is able to offer a truly holistic IoT solution and help solve connectivity issues being faced in regional Australia.
     Dr. Grant continued by noting that with Myriota direct-to-orbit IoT connectivity, the company can provide connectivity for IoT that works outside the areas of cellular footprint, which extends reach as well as offering an alternative carrier alongside things like 4G, 5G or narrowband IoT with very, very low power use. That’s advantageous sometimes, to have a mix of technologies where different technologies are doing different things.

Optus Business Managing Director Chris Mitchell said he was excited to see the impact that collaborating with Myriota would have for Optus customers.

Story by The Lead South Australia contributor, Jessica Bassano.


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…

Viasat Selects Blue Canyon Technologies to Build MILSATCOM Smallsat for USAF Test Mission

Viasat has selected Blue Canyon Technologies (BCT) to design and manufacture a cubesat for a U.S. Air Force test of a military communications terminal in LEO.

BCT announced plans on August 19 to build a 12-unit cubesat bus equipped with Viasat’s Link 16 terminal to be launched in 2020. U.S. military and NATO allies rely on Link 16, an encrypted radio frequency, to relay information in a line-of-sight from aircraft, ships and ground vehicles. If Link 16 terminals work on smallsats, they could relay military communications beyond a vehicle’s line-of-sight.

BCT, a rapidly growing satellite manufacturer in Boulder, Colorado, is building more than 60 spacecraft for government, commercial and academic customers. For the Link 16 mission, BCT will supply one of the firm’s XB1 spacecraft buses that comes equipped with subsystems including power, propulsion, flight control software, radio frequency communications, attitude control, and guidance, navigation and control.

BCT is currently building more than 60 spacecraft for government, commercial and academic missions. The company has doubled in size over the past 12 months and plans to open its new 80,000-square-foot headquarters and production facility in 2020.

In May, the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles directorate awarded Viasat a $10 million contract to test whether a Link 16 terminal on a small satellite could serve as a communications network relay, in a program called XVI. BCT declined to comment on the value of its Link 16 contract with Viasat.

George Stafford, BCT CEO and President, said the company is honored to participate in this important pilot project. To date, Link 16 technology has only been capable of line-of-sight communications. By demonstrating that Link 16 can operate in a space environment on small satellites, the U.S. military can gain beyond-line-of-sight tactical advantages on the battlefield and ultimately keep our troops safer.

Ken Peterman, Viasat Government Systems President, added that Viasat is thrilled to have Blue Canyon Technologies supporting the XVI program. This Link 16-capable LEO spacecraft will address the Department of Defense’s urgent need for a fast-to-market, cost-effective, space-based Link 16 solution to maintain the technological edge needed in contested environments.


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…

Proposals Selected by NASA for Smallsat Technologies Demos to Study Interplanetary Space

NASA has selected two proposals to demonstrate small satellite technologies to improve science observations in deep space, which could help NASA develop better models to predict space weather events that can affect astronauts and spacecraft.


NASA has selected two proposals to demonstrate technologies to improve science observations in deep space. The proposals could help NASA develop better models to predict space weather events that can affect astronauts and spacecraft, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs).

In this image, taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory on Feb. 27, 2000, a CME is seen erupting from the Sun, which is hidden by the disk in the middle, so the fainter material around it can be seen.

Image is courtesy of ESA/NASA/SOHO.

Both proposals, funded at $400,000 for nine month mission concept studies, were selected based on potential technology and science value and the feasibility of development plans. They support NASA’s heliophysics program, which seeks to better understand the nature of space throughout the solar system and how it changes in response to the constant outpouring of energy and particles from the Sun and how it interacts with planetary atmospheres.

At the conclusion of the nine-month study period, one proposal will be selected to launch as a secondary payload with NASA’s Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) spacecraft in October 2024. Taking advantage of NASA’s cost-saving rideshare initiative, it will be accompanied by two other science missions — a NASA science mission of opportunity and a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) space weather forecasting mission.

Peg Luce, Deputy Director of the Heliophysics Division at NASA Headquarters, said this is the first time that NASA’s heliophysics program has funded this kind of technology demonstration. Providing the opportunity to mature and test technologies in deep space is a crucial step towards incorporating new techniques into future missions.

Thomas Zurbuchen, Associate Administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, added that by focusing on smallsats and capitalizing on the cost savings of sharing a launch, NASA can test and advance cutting-edge technologies at a reasonable price. The agency is leading the charge in using this innovative solution to test new mission paradigms and technologies.

The proposals for the technology demonstrations are:

Science-Enabling Technologies for Heliophysics (SETH)
SETH would demonstrate two technologies. The first is an optical communications technology for small satellites and CubeSats that is less complex than current systems and could enable a hundredfold increase in deep space data rates, while reducing the burden on NASA’s Deep Space Network. Such technology could help support future small satellite constellations that require high data rate communications systems.

The second technology demonstration aboard SETH detects solar energetic neutral atoms – fast-moving atoms flowing from the Sun that do not have a charge – as well as an array of waves and other particles that erupt from our Sun. Called the HELio Energetic Neutral Atom (HELENA) detector, the instrument provides observations that could enable advanced warnings of potential space radiation threats to astronauts.

The principal investigator for SETH is Antti Pulkkinen at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Solar Cruiser
The Solar Cruiser investigation also demonstrates two technologies. A nearly 18,000-square-foot solar sail would demonstrate the ability to use solar radiation as a propulsion system. Such a system could provide views of the Sun not easily accessible with current technology.

The coronagraph instrument would enable simultaneous measurements of the Sun’s magnetic field structure and velocity of coronal mass ejections, or CMEs. These giant explosions of solar material are ejected into space and can set off space weather storms that, at their worst, interfere with utility grids on Earth. Improving data-gathering technology in this area is particularly useful for advance warning systems for at-risk infrastructure on Earth.

The principal investigator for Solar Cruiser is Les Johnson at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

All funding for these missions comes from the Heliophysics Solar Terrestrial Probes program, which is managed by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.


For all involved in the satellite and space industry and the various market segments that add value to these dynamic environments, the 2020 SmallSat Symposium is truly worth your consideration for attendance.

The 2020 SmallSat Symposium starts on February 3, 2020, with workshops, then the Conference runs February 4 to 6 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

The SmallSat Symposium is hosted by Satnews Publishers which, since 1983, has been a provider of a satellite news, media and events. This information packed forum was created to enable you and your company to secure a larger portion of market share as well as to take part in the next stages of your company’s or organization’s growth.

The personal connections at the SmallSat Symposium enable attendees to network with established organizations, subject-matter experts as well as ‘New Space’ entrants.

The SmallSat Symposium will focus on new technologies and the business environment that is shaping the implementation of smallsat constellations, smallsat launchers, the challenges facing the smallsat developer and actors as well as the enormous benefits of these advanced technologies that will benefit our world.

This event assembles more than 100 diverse speakers, all of whom possess deep industry experience. Additionally, numerous opportunities exist to mingle and network with peers while enjoying exceptional, complimentary meals and refreshment breakfast.

Learn more at this direct link…